New Page: My Bookshelf

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I've heard that one of the first things you should do when in somebody's home is peruse their bookshelf. You get a glimpse into that person's mind and what piques their interests.

After a few requests from friends for reading recommendations, I decided to put together my own virtual bookshelf at http://zakslayback.com/bookshelf . This is inspired by Patrick Collison's here.

Here, you'll find all the books I purchased on Amazon since December 2016 (I may go back further at some point, but that was enough for now). I buy most books on recommendation from friends and tend to shy away from popular nonfiction (like Thinking, Fast and Slow) unless I have a specific reason for picking it up or somebody recommends it to me. I tend to find that listening to interviews on these books or reading recaps will give me more value for my time. These aren't necessarily all books I recommend reading, although I do usually sample a book via Kindle before I purchase it, so the books I tried and did not like do not make the list.

I'll update this page occasionally. As of now, it's an unlisted page you can find through "Meet Zak."

Do you have any recommendations I should add to my list? If so, tweet them at me @zslayback or comment on my most recent post on Instagram @zslayback.

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I'm Zak. School should have taught you how to succeed at work and build a great career. Instead, it taught you that mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell. Thankfully, I teach what school never taught.

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