School is Creating a Generation of Unhappy People

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It's said that pain isn't the opposite of happiness -- boredom is.

With this premise in mind, is it any surprise that children, adolescents, and young adults today are so unhappy? Is it any surprise that so many turn to extending their schooled lives into structured activities as long as possible? Is it any surprise that when people don't know what to do, they simply go to graduate school?

To understand this mass unhappiness and boredom with life -- and the sudden uptick in quarter-life crises -- look at where these young people have spent most of their lives.

What we see today in Millennials and younger is something henceforth unseen in the United States: a fully-schooled generation. Every young person, save the occasional homeschooler, today has been through schools. This means rich & poor, established & unestablished, and developed & undeveloped young adults have all been put through roughly the same exact system with the same general experiences for the last two decades of their lives.

School teaches them that life is broken into discernible chunks and and that learning and personal development are to be seen as work. Rather than teaching them how to foster a love of learning, a constantly-centralizing school regime in the US today teaches them to look for standards to be measured against. Rather than helping give them the cognitive and philosophical tools necessary to lead fulfilled lives in the context of the world in which they live, schools remove them from this world and force them to develop these skills only after 18-25 years of being alive. Rather than allowing them to integrate themselves into the broader scheme of life and learn what they get fulfillment from achieving and what they don't, school leaves fulfillment to five letter grades and a few minutes of recess.

“We destroy the love of learning in children, which is so strong when they are small, by encouraging and compelling them to work for petty and contemptible rewards, gold stars, or papers marked 100 and tacked to the wall, or A's on report cards, or honor rolls, or dean's lists, or Phi Beta Kappa keys, in short, for the ignoble satisfaction of feeling that they are better than someone else.” -- John Holt

In short, school teaches apathy towards education and detachment from the world. School removes people from being forced to learn how to get fulfillment from a variety of activities and subjects and instead foists a handful of clunky subjects onto them hoping they meet state standards for "reading," "mathematics," "writing," and "science."

Not only this, but they've had childhood extended further into adulthood than any other generation before them. A young person today is considered a "child" much longer than a young person 20 or 40 years ago would have been considered as much. To treat a 16 year-old as a child in the 1960s would have been insulting. Today, it is commonplace.

Adult children wander the hallways of universities and workplaces today, less-equipped to find purpose and meaning than their predecessors. They can't be entirely blamed for their anxiety and depression -- their parents, teachers, and leaders put them through an institution and created a cultural norm that created the world they live in today.

This is the perfect formula for creating a group of constantly bored people. They've been deprived of a chance to find meaning for themselves in subjects by engaging with them on a deep level and internalizing the responsibility necessary to live in the world. They've been cut off from opportunities to make real connections with people based on more than a lottery of ZIP codes for a decade. They've been taught that achievement is getting to the next level set by people outside of themselves.

Pain isn't the opposite of happiness -- boredom is. A fully schooled generation has created a generation of bored adult children. It's no wonder young people today seem so unhappy.

 

I'm Zak. I'm a venture capital professional and writer focusing on how to build a great career. You can find my writings here or reach out to me at zak@1517fund.com.

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